Silly Saturday: Architect Humor Slide Show

Sit back and enjoy this slide show of architect humor compiled by the folks at the Australian firm, BXL Design Architects.

Check out more serious architecture videos, on the  BXL Design Architects’ You Tube channel.

Comments
Albert Paley: Swirls of Steel

The Corcoran Gallery of Art’s Web site calls Albert Paley, “one of the world’s most distinguished metalsmiths.” During his more than 50 year career Paley has worked at all scales from jewelry to large public installations and in a varied range of metals: steel, brass, iron, copper, gold to name a few.1

Paley’s public installations include the gateway at the St. Louis Zoo, portals at the New York State Senate in Albany, doors to the book store at the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery, and a gate at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC.2

In 1995, Paley was awarded awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Institute of Architects, the AIA’s highest award to a non-architect. He is the only metalsmith to have received that award.1

A retrospective of Albert Paley’s work, "American Metal: The Art of Albert Paley" can been viewed now through September 28, 2014 at The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

For more on the artist and his work visit the Albert Paley Studios site.

image
Albert Paley, Pendant (1973), silver, ivory, plexiglas, copper, gold, amethyst beads, glass lens, opal, moonstone and amethyst crystal.
Photo credit: © 2014 Paley Studios Source

References

  1. Corcoran Gallery of Art (2014). American Metal: The Art of Albert Paley, http://www.corcoran.org/exhibitions/american-metal-art-albert-paley
  2. National Public Radio (2014). With Swirls Of Steel, These Sculptures Mark The Passage Of People And Time, http://www.npr.org/2014/07/22/333596118/with-swirls-of-steel-these-sculptures-mark-the-passage-of-people-and-time
Comments
A Short History of Electric Cars

With ever-rising gas prices and greater concerns about our environment, electric and hy-brid motor vehicles are gaining popularity. We may think of these automobiles as a recent development but, earlier this year, Design News posted an interesting slideshow of the history of electric cars which were designed in the late Nineteenth Century and throughout the Twentieth.

Thomas EdisonThomas Edison (left) and an electric automobile that used one of his nickel-iron batteries (c. 1910). Source.

Pictured here we see that even American inventor Thomas Edison had designed a version of an electric car. In a 1911 interview with the New York Times, Edison stated that the vehicle’s battery “is simple, light, easy to take care of, and far more efficient than the old lead battery. It has none of the disadvantages of the latter, which resulted in bringing electric transportation into such disfavor abroad.”

Comments
Closed for 25 Years Staten Island’s Paramount Theatre Survives

Nick Carr of ScoutingNY.com takes a fascinatingly beautiful, yet eerie photo tour of Staten Island’s Paramount Theatre. According to Carr, the Paramount, which opened in 1930, was Staten Island’s most elaborate movie theater and even served at one time as a nightclub and concert venue for many of New York City’s rock bands. The building, however, has been closed and has sat vacant for the past twenty-five years.

Several years ago, investors had planned to reopen the Paramount as a restaurant and performance center, but the plans were not realized,

Thanks go out to Kevin Lee Allen and Kathleen McDonough for sharing the ScoutingNY.com post on their Facebook pages. By the way, check out their blog; it’s pretty cool.

Paramount Theatre

Paramount Theatre, (c. 1930), architect unknown.
Photo credit: Nick Carr, ScoutingNY.com © 2014 Source

Comments
Silly Saturday: Patron Saints of Graphic Design

Editor’s Note: This article was originally posted on November 12, 2011.

Slightly blasphemous but nonetheless amusing are W. Lynn Garrett's Patron Saints of Graphic Design. As a survivor of both Catholic school and art school, I hope these “saints” are watching out for me.

Thanks to Jacob Cass of Just Creative Design for sharing.

St. Typo

W. Lynn Garrett, Saint Typo (2003).
Source: http://images4.cpcache.com/nocache/product/11119214v2147483647_150x150_Front.jpg

Comments
All Wright Walk 2014: Unity Temple (1905)

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple was the only Wright designed building included on the 2014 All Wright House Walk that was not a house, unless you consider the structure as a house of worship.

image
Frank Lloyd Wright, Unity Temple (1905-1908), Oak Park, IL.

Unity Temple, perhaps one of Wright’s finest works, was named a National Historic Landmark in 1970.1

image
Unity Temple, motto (exterior detail).

According to the brochure that accompanied the All Wright 2014 tour, there are more than one hundred art glass windows within the building; a fine example is shown here

image
Unity Temple, art glass inset (exterior detail).

The columns of Unity Temple’s facade features a hollyhock motif one of Wright’s recurring designs, used in several of his buildings from this the period.

imageUnity Temple, balastrade on the front facade (exterior detail).

image
A dramatic view of the exterior of Unity Temple at night.

For more information on Unity Temple visit the Unity Temple Restoration Foundation Web site.

All photos credit: Bill Bowen © 2014.

Reference

1. Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, (2014). All Wright Walk [Brochure].

Comments
All Wright Walk 2014: Arthur B. Heurtley House

imageFrank Lloyd Wright, Arthur B. Heurtley House (1902), Oak Park IL.
Photo Credit: Bill Bowen Copyright 2014.

The Arthur B. Huertley House is one of the finest examples of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie homes. Built, in 1092 for banker Arthur B. Huertley and his family, the home features a “broad chimney, low-hipped roof, deep overhangs, concrete base and tapered walls”1. Wright used two colors of brick in contrasting horizontal bands to emphasize the building’s horizontal lines and convey a sense of hugging the land.

Like Wright’s earlier William G. Fricke House (1901), the Heurtley House features a prow shaped porch pictured in the above photo flanked by two enormous planters.

Comments
All Wright Walk 2014: William G. Fricke House (1901)

The William G. Fricke house is, much like his William Martin House (1903), one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie homes that accentuates the vertical rather than the horizontal.1

image
Frank Lloyd Wright, William G. Fricke House (1901), Oak Park IL.

The overhanging eaves and raised wood banding are striking elements of the structure’s architecture design.

image
Frank Lloyd Wright, William G. Fricke House (1901) entrance, Oak Park IL.

The Fricke House features a distinctive prow like Wright’s later work, the Peter A. Beachy House (1906).

image
Frank Lloyd Wright, William G. Fricke House (1901) exterior detail, Oak Park IL.

All photos credit: Bill Bowen © 2014.

Reference

1. Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, (2014). All Wright Walk [Brochure].

Comments
All Wright Walk 2014: Peter A. Beachy House (1906)

Architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed this residence for Peter and Susan Emma Beachy immediately after returning from his first visit to Japan; this enormous house reflects the Japanese influence (though Wright himself rarely if ever admitted to being influenced by anything or anyone). Another home featured on the All Wright 2014, the Hills-DeCaro House (1906) also exhibits Japanese influence.1

The current owners are superb, ideal and sensitive stewards of the remarkable Beachy House.

imageFrank Lloyd Wright, Peter A. Beachy House (1906).

Below is a detail shot of the Beachy House exterior.

image

All photos credit: Bill Bowen © 2014.

Reference

1. Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, (2014). All Wright Walk [Brochure].

Comments
All Wright Walk 2014: Hills-DeCaro House (1906)

It is difficult to believe that Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hills-DeCaro House (1906) was originally a Stick-style house that Wright was commissioned to remodel by Nathan Moore who the property next door. It is even more difficult to believe that most of the existing structure was rebuilt in the late 1970’s after a devastating fire destroyed all but the first floor of the home. The home is jointly named for the home’s original owners the Hills and for the DeCaros who restored the home close to Wright’s original vision.

image
Frank Lloyd Wright, Hills-DeCaro House (1906, restored 1977-78), Oak Park, IL.

With steeply pitched roofs and flared eaves, the home is an example of Japanese influence on Wright’s architecture after his 1905 trip there. The Peter A. Beachy House also exhibits this Eastern style.

image
Hills-DeCaro House exterior detail of roof and eaves.

imageA restored ticket booth from 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition graces the home’s side yard.

All photos credit: Bill Bowen © 2014.

Comments